Cover Reveal

Boxed Set of SP Books 3d with reflection

As you know, I have a few books on self-publishing. The first was originally published in 2009. I designed the original covers myself, and felt they worked for nonfiction: The main point was that the titles were easy to read in the thumbnails.

The big problem for me was that my covers didn’t have a unified look. So I hired Melissa Stevens (www.theillustratedauthor.net) to make them more unified and to add an image that might help them pop. We settled on a geometric approach, arranging the covers of my books in a cube, spheres, and a pyramid.

She also designed a matching header (you can see it now at WordPress and Facebook), shaped like a cylinder.

The cover that impressed me most was the boxed set (coming soon) that I used for this cover reveal above. I like this perspective, which shows off the front cover while still allowing for ample detail on the spines.

Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

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Self-Publishing Boxed Set: Cover Reveal & Question

Self Publishing Omnibus

A recent publishing trend is to release a boxed set some time after completing a series. Once buzz for the final volume seems to settle, a boxed set provides an opportunity to revitalize interest in your series. It will also get your series back into the new release categories one last time.

Each volume can only be on sale periodically. If priced at a good value, even when the boxed set is at its regular list price, it still has the allure of being on sale—because readers save money compared to each volume individually. Another thing the boxed set can do is entice readers to buy the entire series up front, rather than one volume at a time (thereby avoiding some of the readers who might not reach the end).

(It doesn’t necessarily have to be a series, although a boxed set is most common for series; it could be a set of very similar books.)

The boxed set helps to establish the perception of great value.

You could add bonus material, but you may want to consider this carefully. Is the bonus material available separately? Your loyal fans who have purchased each volume separately might not appreciate having to also buy the boxed set just to get the bonus material. If you can solve this problem, then it can add further value to your boxed set without upsetting your fans.

Cover Reveal

I don’t have any boxed sets yet, but as you can see with my cover reveal, I have one in the works. Please share your feedback on the cover design (while keeping in mind that I don’t intend to redo the original covers of Volumes 1 and 2, and therefore intend to preserve this aspect of the boxed set design).

Question

Here’s my question: What would you call a nonfiction boxed set?

Of course, it could just be called a boxed set. The term omnibus is used frequently for boxed sets. Would you use omnibus for nonfiction, or you do think it should be used for fiction only? Can you suggest an alternative? I appreciate any suggestions. Thank you in advance.

Publishing Resources

I started this blog to provide free help with writing, publishing, and marketing. You can find many free articles on publishing and marketing by clicking one of the following links:

Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.