Book Giveaways (How to + Chance 2 win)

Images from ShutterStock.

Images from ShutterStock.

BOOK GIVEAWAYS

This post has two parts:

  1. Quick tips for hosting a book giveaway
  2. Several contests by a variety of authors that you can enter

I’ll give the tips first.

Find the contests that you can enter below. There are many cool books there by different authors.

Entering those contests is quick and easy.

And the last one on the list is free to everyone.

So you’re guaranteed to get at least one free book.

TIPS FOR BOOK CONTESTS

Tip #1 Trust & Convenience

Most readers are familiar with Goodreads and Amazon, and trust these companies. This helps to get reader participation.

Running Goodreads and Amazon giveaways is easy and convenient, provided that you have a print edition (you can publish in paperback for free using CreateSpace). You can quickly setup a Goodreads giveaway from your author dashboard. Find the option to run an Amazon giveaway at the bottom of the print edition’s detail page (US only).

Check out this post for everything you ever wanted to know about Amazon and Goodreads giveaways, and more.

For e-books enrolled in KDP Select, you can run a free promo, but you really need to find websites and bloggers with a large following in your genre or category to really get the most out of the exposure. See tip #2.

Update: When you publish a Kindle e-book through KDP, now you can run an Amazon Giveaway for the e-book.

Tip #2 Promoting the Giveaway

For Amazon giveaways, tweet about it using the #AmazonGiveaway hashtag. Don’t add a photo to your tweet and it will likely be included automatically. I’ve received excellent exposure for a few hours tweeting with this hashtag without including a photo in the tweet.

For Goodreads giveaways, it’s all about the tags that you enter. So here’s what you do first. Visit this Goodreads giveaway page. Look on the right column for the tags and click the More link beneath it. This will show you the 1000 most popular tags in order. Although you can enter several tags (separated by commas), only use tags appropriate for your book.

To help advertise free e-books, you can find a list of promotional websites here.

Tip #3 Group Marketing

Sure, you can mention your own contest on your own blog, social media, or email newsletter.

Or you could get together with 19 other authors, and all of you could promote all 20 contests to your much larger combined following.

It’s a great idea for readers, too. If you learn about one contest, you have to click on the link, login, enter the contest—it’s kind of a hassle, especially when you were busy doing something else when you learned about the contest. And your chance of winning one contest is outrageously slim.

But if you have a list of 20 Goodreads giveaways for related books, a reader can login once, click on all the links in succession, and enter 20 giveaways in about a minute. And your odds of winning are 20 times better. it’s a win-win-win situation.

(That’s not quite what I’ve done. I have a few contests running. I thought that instead of just mentioning my own books only, I could invite others to get a little exposure on my blog. But maybe my example shows you how 20 authors could get together and get a lot more exposure out of their contests.)

Tip #4 Beyond Self-Promo

You could just write one post about your contest. Or a few posts and several tweets about it.

Or you could write posts all month long about other things, and simply mention your contest at the end of your posts.

For example, my current post includes several contests that you can enter (see below), but it also provides tips for running a contest.

Most of my blog’s followers are authors with interests in self-publishing. A hundred or so people might read my post when it comes out. But if one of my posts generates search engine traffic, it can generate hundreds or thousands of views over the course of a year, and from an audience who didn’t previously know who I am. A post that includes tips about a contest has better search engine potential than one that simply promotes a list of books.

You probably don’t have the same audience as I do, but you can similarly mention your contest as part of posts on other subjects.

CONTESTS TO ENTER

These contests are easy to enter.

Most of these are Goodreads giveaways. So you could login to Goodreads once, click on the contest links in succession, and quickly enter as many of these contests as interest you.

The more contests you enter, the better your chances of winning. Good luck.

And the last one is simply free. You’re guaranteed to get that book free (unless you discovered this article after Wednesday, June 17, 2015, probably according to Amazon Pacific time).

Cursive Handwriting for Math Lovers by Julie Harper and Chris McMullen

a Goodreads giveaway; expires June 30, 2015

You can also win it through an Amazon Giveaway here

Try both and you improve your chances of winning.

Learn or Review Trigonometry: Essential Skills by Chris McMullen

a Goodreads giveaway; expires July 15, 2015

Why Do We Have to Go to School? by Chris McMullen

a Goodreads giveaway; expires July 7, 2015

Also, see the last contest on this list below.

Weary of Running by Adrienne Morris

a Goodreads giveaway; expires June 20, 2015

from the author: “Weary of Running is about Cadet Buck Crenshaw and his less than successful life at West Point Military Academy in the 1880’s.”

The Legend of Dust Bunnies, a Fairy’s Tale by Michelle R. Eastman

a Goodreads giveaway; expires July 4, 2015

a children’s picture book

from the author: “It’s the story of a dust fairy who doesn’t quite fit in with the others… This story will have families looking at dust bunnies in a different light and may give kids an excuse NOT to clean their rooms!”

Island in the Clouds by Susan M. Toy

a Goodreads giveaway; expires June 21, 2015

also, see the author’s blog here for additional contest info

Ridgetop by Carol Ervin

a Goodreads giveaway; expires July 4, 2015

thriller, suspense

Time Shifters + 3 more books by Shanna Lauffey

contest hosted by the author through Facebook and Twitter

Blood and Bane: The Dragon Sage Chronicles by CK McKee, narrated by Wendy Anne Darling

audio book

10 free Audible codes to give away (US & UK codes)

Wacky Stories (10 Short Stories for Kids) by Julie Harper, narrated by Michael Pauley

audio book

25 free Audible codes to give away (US & UK codes)

M.J. Moore is looking for submissions for an anthology from Canadian residents

Find out more here.

This last one is FREE via Kindle Tuesday, June 16 and Wednesday, June 17, 2015 (probably Amazon Pacific time).

Why Do We Have to Go to School? by Chris McMullen

Not a contest. It’s just free for two days.

I guarantee that you will enjoy this book. If not, please let me know, and I’ll happily gift you another book (not necessarily my own).

Where else will you find a guarantee like this? (Especially, a guarantee when you’re getting a FREE book.)

Write happy, be happy. 🙂

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2015

Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • 4-in-1 Boxed set includes both volumes and more
  • Kindle Formatting Magic (coming soon)

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

Any Authors Running a Contest?

Images from ShutterStock

Images from ShutterStock

BOOK CONTEST

Do you have any contests or giveaways, such as a Goodreads giveaway, presently underway or planned to launch soon?

If so, please let me know.

I’ll be happy to mention your giveaway when I mention my own giveaways (which will be soon).

If you have a cover reveal coming soon, or recently posted, I may also have a chance to mention that.

For a giveaway or contest, just leave a comment with a link to your giveaway.

For a cover reveal, once you have a post revealing your cover, leave a comment with a link to your cover reveal post.

It only seems logical. Why mention just my own contest instead of several?

But I just need to know what those other contests are so that I can mention them.

Write happy, be happy. 🙂

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2015

Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • 4-in-1 Boxed set includes both volumes and more
  • Kindle Formatting Magic (coming soon)

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

#AmazonGiveaway Tip: How to find more giveaways

Giveaway 4D

AMAZON GIVEAWAYS

You can win free stuff shipped by Amazon.

Note: As of October, 2019, the Amazon Giveaway program has been canceled. However, Goodreads Giveaways are still available.

Visit the Twitter page for the hashtag #AmazonGiveaway:

https://twitter.com/hashtag/AmazonGiveaway

When you visit this page, it only shows you a few of the results.

It doesn’t show you all of the results

UNLESS… you click the ALL link at the top of the page, under where it says, “Results for #AmazonGiveaway.”

By default, it only shows what it considers to be the top results.

When I browse the top results, I find a limited number of giveaways from the past several hours, and below that I find expired giveaways.

Increase your chances of winning by clicking ALL instead of the default TOP.

When I pull up all of the giveaways, I find many more giveaways that I can enter, which haven’t expired.

If you create your own giveaway, tweet about it with the hashtag #AmazonGiveaway.

This adds your contest to the Amazon Giveaway page at Twitter.

However, when you search for your contest on the Amazon Giveaway hashtag page, you might not see it unless you click the ALL link.

After clicking ALL, you should be able to find your contest.

Here is your chance to win my Visual Guide to Extra Dimensions book in an Amazon Giveaway. No purchase necessary. See official rules: http://amzn.to/GArules. Just click this link to enter (you can enter even if you already follow me; it’s not restricted to new Twitter followers):

https://giveaway.amazon.com/p/485fd2882c555252

Note that the hashtag page for #AmazonGiveaway shows all tweets using this hashtag, whereas the similar @AmazonGiveaway does not. (Of course, one is the hashtag, the other is the entity.) However, if you visit @AmazonGiveaway by mistake, you can click the #AmazonGiveaway hashtag in one of their recent tweets to reach the hashtag page.

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2015

Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • 4-in-1 Boxed set includes both volumes and more

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

Comments

Click here to jump to the comments section:

https://chrismcmullen.wordpress.com/2015/03/04/amazongiveaway-tip-how-to-find-more-giveaways/#comments

My Experience with Amazon & Goodreads Giveaways

Image from Shutterstock

Image from Shutterstock

BOOK CONTESTS

Amazon has a new giveaway option for physical products, like print books. Scroll down toward the bottom of the product page to find this option.

Update: KDP authors can now run Amazon Giveaways for e-books, too.

Goodreads also has an option for authors to give away free books.

I’ve run several Goodreads giveaways and I’ve also run four Amazon Giveaways to give free print books away.

Here is how the two giveaway programs compare:

Note: As of October, 2019, the Amazon Giveaway program has been canceled. However, Goodreads Giveaways are still available.

COST

Goodreads giveaways win when it comes to the author’s cost:

  • At Goodreads, you can order author copies directly then ship them yourself with the cheapest shipping method available (economical if you restrict the winners to your own country). If you live in the US, you can also ship to US addresses via media mail. (It may be even more economical to drop-ship directly to the customer, rather than order author copies to your home first. However, ordering author copies lets you inspect the books first.)
  • At Amazon, you pay full retail price for the books plus standard shipping charges. You must pay up front when the contest begins. Although you will earn a royalty, it will still cost much more than a Goodreads giveaway, in general.

TRUST

Both Amazon and Goodreads are trusted by customers.

Although Amazon actually owns Goodreads, Amazon is the more recognizable brand. Readers who have Goodreads accounts trust Goodreads, but it’s harder to drive readers who don’t use Goodreads to sign up.

Also, Amazon ships the books directly to winners, and Amazon has a good customer service policy in case there are any issues (like damage during shipping or a defective book).

Therefore, I give Amazon a slight advantage in the trust department.

TIME

Amazon again has a small advantage with regard to time:

  • The big thing is that Amazon ships the book directly to the winner (with standard shipping) as soon as the winner is declared, which is pretty good delivery time.
  • Also at Amazon, entrants find out immediately upon entry whether or not they win. There is no delay. With Goodreads, you can enter a giveaway today and it might not end for weeks, by which time you’ve forgotten about it.
  • Amazon approved each of my giveaways within a couple of hours; Goodreads usually takes a day or more.
  • Amazon giveaways run for one week or less; most of my giveaways were over in a few hours. You can run a short-term Goodreads giveaway, but it will cost you traffic. Amazon giveaways can generate good traffic in one day (but see my Promotion note below). I usually run my Goodreads giveaways for a month to generate as much traffic as I can.
  • If you want to give out books in a hurry, you can choose an Amazon giveaway to award winners on a first-come, first-serve basis. (However, my recommendation is to use the Lucky winner option, where 1 in 50 or 1 in 100 will win. In my experience, the books still go out quickly. See my Promotion note below.)

AUDIENCE

There is a big difference between the audience for Amazon giveaways and the audience for Goodreads giveaways.

Readers enter Goodreads giveaways. They love to read books. They search for books that they are interested in.

A much broader audience enters Amazon giveaways. There is a good chance that many of the people who enter Amazon giveaways aren’t specifically looking for your book. They might just be hoping to win something cool from Amazon, and your book is one of many products giving them that chance.

This means there is a greater chance that your book won’t be read, that the reader won’t be familiar with your genre, etc. (That’s if you use the #AmazonGiveaway hashtag. If instead you promote exclusively on your own, you can control the targeting better. But then popular is reduced to what you can achieve on your own.)

TARGETING (BIG FACTOR*)

Goodreads lets you target giveaways by entering keywords. (Tip: First search the Goodreads giveaways to see which keywords are in use and how popular they are. Try to find popular keywords in use at Goodreads giveaways which are a good fit for your book.)

Amazon doesn’t let you target your giveaway. If you tweet your Amazon giveaway with the hashtag #AmazonGiveaway, everybody looking for free Amazon merchandise will see your contest. Some won’t be readers; some won’t be readers in your genre. Everyone at Goodreads is a reader, and with all the Goodreads giveaways to choose from, most will be readers. (However, instead of using the #AmazonGiveaway hashtag, you could promote on your own, though that will diminish the popularity of the contest, unless you have a great marketing base or plan.)

TRAFFIC

Amazon giveaways generate a lot of traffic in a short period of time IF you tweet your giveaway using the #AmazonGiveaway hashtag.

I ran a couple of giveaways where every 100th entrant would win, where I gave away 5 books. Most of my contests were over (or nearly so) within a few hours. That means 500 people saw the book in a span of a few hours.

Goodreads giveaways can also generate good traffic, but it takes time. You get the most traffic on the first and last days of the giveaway, but all the days in the middle add up, too. If you run a giveaway for a whole month, you can get 1000 or so entries, depending on how wisely you select your keywords and how popular your book is.

POPULARITY

Amazon giveaways seem to be popular. For one, Amazon is huge. You can win products at Amazon, shipped to you directly from Amazon. How cool is that?

There are some cool products in the Amazon giveaways. I saw one for a guitar. Great prizes put people in good moods.

Also, the Amazon giveaway is new, so it has people curious.

Goodreads giveaways are also popular among Goodreads members. And since the Amazon giveaway is new, people are still learning about it.

Both kinds of giveaways are pretty popular right now.

EXPERIENCE

Customer experience in these giveaways is good in both cases.

Obviously, Amazon is well-known, well-trusted, and has a great satisfaction guarantee.

But Goodreads members love their giveaways, too.

A nice thing about the Goodreads giveaway is that you can ship the book to the winner directly, allowing you to inspect it firsthand and pack it nicely so you know that the winner receives a great copy of your book (no defects, no damage—if you pack very well).

REVIEWS

Goodreads encourages winners to review books. Goodreads also selects winners who are more likely to be a good fit for your book or who are more likely to review books that they win.

Not every Goodreads winner posts a review, however. If you give away 5 books, you might get a couple of reviews. There are no guarantees, though.

Goodreads winners are more likely to post a review or rating at Goodreads. Very often, they don’t also post the review at Amazon, but it does happen once in a while.

You might think that Amazon giveaway winners would be more likely to post a review at Amazon. But the audience for these giveaways isn’t restricted to just readers, and the contest isn’t targeted, so it might not work out that way.

FOLLOWERS

You can require people who enter your contest to follow you on Twitter. If they already follow you, they can still enter the contest. (Note that you can also waive the Twitter requirement.)

I tried this on a couple of giveaways. With every 100th entrant winning and 5 books to giveaway, I had a few hundred extra followers on Twitter in a few hours.

Wow! I thought that Twitter option would discourage entries, but it didn’t seem much different from my other giveaways.

You’re not “buying” followers. You’re saying, “Since you’re interest in this book, perhaps you’d be interested in following the author of this book.” And they can simply unfollow you afterward, if they wish, so really there aren’t any strings attached.

Since they are willing to win your book, they must have some interest in that genre or content, right? (Well, some people just want to win something.) So many of these followers are indeed relevant to your audience. Unlike all the promises you see of people who can give you hundreds of followers, this contest can actually attract Twitter followers who have some interest in books like yours. However, since the contest isn’t targeted, they probably aren’t as relevant as, say, Goodreads winners would be.

Here’s another way to look at the optional Twitter follow requirement. The people who are actually willing to follow you on Twitter are probably, on average, somewhat more interested in your book.

People who enter Goodreads giveaways are unlikely to follow you on Twitter. But they are likely to add your book to their to-read lists, which helps make your book appear more popular at Goodreads. Also, having added your book, they’re more likely to bump into it again in the future.

CONVENIENCE

Both giveaways are convenient for customers to enter. They just need to have an account at the respective site (though presently Amazon giveaways are only open to US customers). If you’re driving traffic to your giveaway, people who don’t have a Goodreads account already need to sign up for one. They’re more likely to already have an Amazon account. Though very many readers do have Goodreads accounts.

Amazon is quite convenient for the author: Set it up in a few minutes and you’re done; Amazon takes care of the rest, except for promotion. However, if you simply tweet your promotion with the #AmazonGiveaway hashtag, in my experience, that is fairly effective for the first few hours.

Goodreads requires obtaining author copies and mailing them yourself (or drop-shipping). It can also be inconvenient, if something comes up in your life at about the same time as the giveaway ends.

PROMOTION

You have to promote the Amazon giveaway. However, if you have Twitter, you can tweet the link to your Amazon giveaway (you receive it in an email an hour or two, usually, after your giveaway is approved) with the hashtag #AmazonGiveaway. If successful, you can get good exposure through that hashtag for a few hours.

The truth is that you can sign up for Twitter for the first time, run a giveaway with 1 winner out of 100, include the option for entrants to follow you on Twitter, and by giving away a few books, you can have a few hundred followers a few hours later (depending on how successful your giveaway goes).

At Goodreads, you just need to select keywords wisely to get decent exposure for your giveaway.

In both cases, you can get added exposure for your contest on your blog, through Twitter of Facebook, by getting bloggers in your genre to mention your contest, and so on. (In fact, if you want to target your Amazon giveaway, one way is to promote it yourself instead of using the #AmazonGiveaway hashtag.)

QUALITY

At Amazon, there is no way to check the book beforehand to ensure that the book isn’t defective. However, Amazon has a great customer satisfaction policy.

At Goodreads, you can choose to order author copies from the publisher, inspect them firsthand, and ship them yourself. If you pack them very well, you’ll have peace of mind that the book will arrive in excellent condition.

INTERNATIONAL

Presently, only US residents (50 states + DC) can enter Amazon giveaways.

If you want to reach UK or Australian readers, Goodreads allows this. However, if you live in the US and allow international entries, shipping can get pretty expensive (and then there is the possible issue of a gift tax, depending…). Or if your book is available at The Book Depository (probably the case if you use CreateSpace’s expanded distribution), you might be able to ship your book internationally for free (though you’ll have to pay the retail price, and it may be higher than Amazon’s list price); and you won’t be able to inspect the books firsthand.

SALES RANK

I wasn’t expecting the Amazon giveaways to impact my sales rank, but I ran four different giveaways and the sales ranks improved considerably soon after the giveaway was promoted.

You have to buy the books directly from Amazon when you initiate the contest. So maybe this impacts your sales rank. (If so, this luxury might not last forever.)

Another possibility is that customers who didn’t win the book went to go buy a copy.

Whatever the reason, you can’t expect a huge impact from this. For one, sales rank tends to quickly settle back where it had been. For another, it’s not a cost-effective thing to do if this is your main goal: You’re paying retail price plus shipping. However, if you’re running the contest for other goals and you happen to get a small boost in sales rank, think of it as a nice surprise.

SALES

Giveaways can net a few sales. There could be short-term sales from people who didn’t win. What you really hope for is branding and long-term sales from recommendations. That is, you hope the winners will actually read your book, and then you hope they’ll like it enough to recommend it. It’s a risk, and it’s a hope. Successful contests help with branding and recommendations.

Amazon giveaways may be more likely to generate an occasional short-term sale. Here’s why: When you enter an Amazon giveaway, you find out immediately whether or not you win. If you really want the product, but you lose, the logical thing to do is check it out, perhaps add it to your cart or even buy it now. But other people will just go enter a different contest instead; it depends on how much they really wanted that product.

Goodreads members can do the same thing with Goodreads giveaways, except that often you don’t find out if you win until days or weeks later. Amazon makes the decision immediately.

WIN A FREE BOOK!

When I published this post, it appears that there is still another copy of my self-publishing guide available to win through an Amazon giveaway. If you haven’t entered this contest yet, here’s your chance to be a winner. Good luck! NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Ends the earlier of DATE / TIME, or when all prizes are claimed. See Official Rules: https://amzn.to/GArules.

https://giveaway.amazon.com/p/e45070404d91f90a

Chris McMullen

Copyright © Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • 4-in-1 Boxed set includes both volumes and more

Giveaway Directly from Amazon.com? Now You Can.

Giveaway SP Vol 1

No purchase necessary. See official rules: http://amzn.to/GArules

 

NEW AMAZON.COM GIVEAWAYS

Now you can give away free physical products, like printed books, directly from Amazon.com.

Note: As of October, 2019, the Amazon Giveaway program has been canceled. However, Goodreads Giveaways are still available.

Amazon hosts the contest:

  • Amazon hosts the giveaway.
  • Amazon determines the winners.
  • Amazon ships brand new products directly to customers.

How does it work?

  • Find the US product page for a physical product available directly from Amazon.com.
  • Update: If you publish through KDP, you can now run giveaways for Kindle ebooks.
  • Scroll down to the bottom of the page. Look for Set up an Amazon Giveaway. Click the gray Set up a Giveaway button.
  • Select Lucky Number or First-Come, First-Served. A Lucky Number giveaway will last longer.
  • Select the number of winners. For a Lucky Number giveaway, also select a number for which entrants (like every 25th entry) will win the contest.
  • You may add your Twitter account and require entrants to follow you on Twitter. This is optional.
  • Click the yellow Next button.
  • Complete the welcome page. If you used the Twitter option, the image will automatically be your Twitter photo. Otherwise, you’ll be able to add your photo on the welcome page.
  • Proceed to checkout. You pay for the books plus estimated shipping charges. Read the terms carefully.
  • The giveaway will expire one week later. Only residents in the 50 US states and DC can enter the contest.
  • Amazon ships the products directly to the winners via standard shipping (3-5 days).

You’ll receive a link to your giveaway by email, separate from your payment confirmation email.

PROMOTE YOUR AMAZON GIVEAWAYS

Here are some things to consider when you promote your Amazon giveaway:

  • Use the words, “Enter for a chance to win.” Don’t say, “Enter to win.” The word “chance” is important. You don’t want to get into legal trouble because your contest was misleading.
  • Include an abbreviated version of the official rules and a link to the official rules. This is required in some states. Amazon suggests including the text, “NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Ends the earlier of DATE / TIME, or when all prizes are claimed. See Official Rules.” Then link to the official rules at http://amzn.to/GArules.
  • Of course, you also want to mention the product that you’re giving away (your book, for example, if you’re an author) and link to your Amazon giveaway.
  • When you tweet about your promotion, include the hashtag #AmazonGiveaway.
  • Promote your giveaway through your blog, your Facebook author page, Twitter, your website, an email newsletter, getting bloggers to promote your contest, or finding sites that promote contests, giveaways, or free products. There will probably be new sites and blogs growing to promote Amazon giveaways, with some specific to books.

Click the following link to see Amazon’s frequently asked questions for giveaways:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/giveaway/faqs/ref=aga_hm_faqs

SOME COOL AMAZON GIVEAWAYS

Here is a chance to win a guitar. How cool is that? (Realize the contest could be over by the time you get there.)

http://t.co/MYRRfKMGXS

Here is a chance to win a Little Golden Book for Disney’s Frozen (realize the contest could be over by the time you get there):

https://t.co/4v0mqPam6v

Here is a chance to win a rice cooker (realize the contest could be over by the time you get there):

https://t.co/zcRJQaAg4h

I have two books in Amazon giveaways.

One is for a chance to win my algebra workbook:

https://giveaway.amazon.com/p/e58cd7d0b2157396

The other is for a chance to win A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon, Volume 1 (realize the contest could be over by the time you get there):

https://giveaway.amazon.com/p/e45070404d91f90a

Author Julie Harper has an Amazon giveaway for one of her cursive handwriting workbooks (realize the contest could be over by the time you get there):

https://giveaway.amazon.com/p/95f8dbd9350ae3df

FIND MORE AMAZON GIVEAWAYS

Visit the Twitter hashtag page for #AmazonGiveaway:

https://twitter.com/search?q=%23AmazonGiveaway

Follow @amazongiveaway on Twitter.

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2015

Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • 4-in-1 Boxed set includes both volumes and more

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

Comments

Click here to jump to the comments section:

https://chrismcmullen.wordpress.com/2015/02/25/giveaway-directly-from-amazon-com-now-you-can/#comments