What’s Better than Freshly Pressed?

Artwork by Melissa Stevens at theillustratedauthor.net.

WORDPRESS

Being Freshly Pressed at WordPress is totally amazing. There isn’t much better than that. 🙂

I had a post featured on Freshly Pressed once. I made a poem entirely out of clichĂ©s (with a clichĂ©d storyline) called “Once Upon a Time” in August, 2013, which was my most popular post ever. It had:

  • 345 Likes
  • 167 Comments
  • 1234 views in August, 2013
  • 298 views of that page on a single day
  • 320 more views in September, 2013
  • 73 more views of this page in October, 2013
  • A few views of that page every week even now (over a year later)
  • Dozens of reblogs, some pingbacks
  • 25 Facebook shares, 12 Twitter shares
  • Numerous follows during this period

That was my 15 minutes of ‘fame’ here at WordPress.

It’s pretty cool that numerous WordPress writers—including a nice variety—find themselves occasionally featured on Freshly Pressed. Everyone has a shot at it.

If you haven’t been featured yet, I hope you will be soon.

So what could be better than Freshly Pressed?

The day after my post was featured on Freshly Pressed, my website had a combined 432 views (298 were of that featured post).

At the time, I was hitting about 100 views per day. I remember thinking, “It would be so cool to hit 432 views all by myself,” i.e. without the help of Freshly Press.

My stats have always grown steadily, but slowly, yet when I was hitting 100 per day, 432 seemed totally unreachable.

A little over a year later, I’ve started to hit 300+ views regularly, and hit 400 a couple of times last month.

Then on November 16, 2014, the unthinkable happened: My site hit 580 views, for a new record.

Best Ever

This time, there was no help from Freshly Pressed. (But there was a nice boost from Australia. Down Under helped put me over the top.)

THANK YOU, THANK YOU to everyone who has supported my humble little blog. YOU are totally awesome. And if you’re familiar with my blog, then you know I really mean that. 🙂

May your new records be coming soon for you, too. (Actually, this is the season for most stats to grow.)

ONCE UPON A TIME

If you want to check out my little poem of clichés, you can find it here:

https://chrismcmullen.wordpress.com/2013/08/21/once-upon-a-time

A few readers have told me that the comments were at least as enjoyable as the poem itself.

I actually have a sequel to that poem called “Beating a Dead Horse”:

https://chrismcmullen.wordpress.com/2013/10/30/beating-a-dead-horse

Read Tuesday

Imagine a Black Friday type of event just for book lovers.

You don’t have to imagine it. It’s called Read Tuesday, and it’s free: www.readtuesday.com.

Please support the Read Tuesday Thunderclap. This will help spread awareness on the morning of Read Tuesday (December 9, 2014). It’s easy to help:

  • Visit http://thndr.it/1CkO2Bg.
  • Click Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr and sign in.
  • Customize the message. (Optional.)
  • Agree to the terms. All that will happen is that the Thunderclap post about Read Tuesday will go out the morning of December 9.
  • (The warning message simply means that Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr need your permission to post the Thunderclap message on December 9. This is the only post that Thunderclap will make.)

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2014 Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • Boxed set (of 4 books for less than the price of 2) now available for Kindle

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

Comments

Click here to jump to the comments section:

https://chrismcmullen.wordpress.com/2014/11/17/whats-better-than-freshly-pressed/#comments

Read More

Read More

READ MORE

Reading more is a good thing, of course. I highly recommend it. But that’s not the focus of my post.

Every writer would love to have more readers. They are so hard to come by.

Yet those Read More links and buttons are spurious.

  • Open your WordPress reader. Some articles show in full within the reader. Others include a teaser and require clicking 460 more words to read the remainder of the article. (Tip: Click the More Words link without first opening the article within the reader to save this extra click.)
  • Read a lengthy description on an Amazon product page. Only the beginning will show, followed by a Read More link. The Author Central biography has a similar Show More link.
  • View news stories on Yahoo or read sports news on your team’s official website. Very often, midway through the article it is interrupted and it’s necessary to click something to read the remainder.

However, anyone in online advertising who knows about click-through rates knows that every extra click costs a significant percentage of traffic.

So all those Read More links lose valuable readers.

What do you gain by withholding the remainder of your article? Is it enough to compensate what you lose by introducing the extra click?

At WordPress, open your Dashboard, go into Settings, choose Reading, and you can toggle between Full Text and Summary next to “For each article in a feed, show…”

Some bloggers show the full text, while others include only a summary.

There are two things to consider:

  • People who already follow you who are viewing your post in the WordPress Reader.
  • People visiting your home page who are seeing your recent posts.

I enjoy reading the posts in my Reader. There are hundreds of posts in there each day. Unfortunately, I can’t read all of them, so I quickly browse through my Reader and select those which most interest me. Many other WordPress users use their Readers this way, too.

A few will click the More Words link without first opening the post within the reader, allowing them to view the full article on your website with a single click. However, many people don’t realize that they can do this. Others know about it, but don’t do it because it takes much more time to load each post on the original site than it does to read it within the Reader. That extra loading time cuts into the number of posts that we can read at one sitting.

Therefore, many people (who might not care to publicly admit it) only read posts that show the full article within the Reader, except for an occasional article that is super compelling.

But why do you need people who are reading articles in the WordPress Reader to visit your site? Ordinarily, you don’t! These are your followers. They’ve been to your site before. They know about any products or services that you offer. You don’t really need for them to visit your site every time they read one of your articles. (You still get the View, Like, Comments, and Reblog option in the Reader, so what are you losing?)

If your site has changed recently and you wish to show this to your followers, just mention it in a separate post and many will make the special trip to check it out (and if they don’t, well, I guess they really didn’t want to, so why make them?).

Here’s what some followers may do if they must use the More Words link to view your full article:

  • Close your post without reading the remainder of the article.
  • Not open your other posts in the future, once they memorize that it takes two clicks to get to your site (since many won’t think to use the ‘trick’ to visit your site in one click, which also takes extra loading time).
  • Like your post to show support without actually reading 90% of the article, simply because reading more would have required an additional click (and extra load time).

Now how about people who happen to come across your home page. Some of these won’t click a More Words link to read the full post. They’re already on your site, so whatever you have on your header and sidebar is already visible to them. Why do they need to visit the actual page to read the full post? They don’t.

If your blog becomes an effective content-rich website, it will pull in people from your target audience through search engine traffic. These people will already go directly to one of your posts on your website, and they won’t be inconvenienced by the More Words link (unless you add an additional interruption using the Insert Read More Tag).

So the only people who are getting inconvenienced by your More Words link are the wonderful people who already follow your blog (and therefore have already been to your site and have seen any products or services that you may offer), or people who are already on your blog’s home page and therefore already see all the goodies on your header and sidebar.

Or is there another advantage of that More Words link that I haven’t considered—a big benefit that compensates for the readers who get lost on the way whenever an extra click is involved?

Just to be clear, I’m not saying that your loyal followers shouldn’t periodically visit your site. I’m just saying, why force them to visit to read the full text? You can always invite them once in a blue moon to see how things have improved.

And when you read posts in your Reader, you should occasionally read the post on the original site, even if the post shows in full in the Reader. Check out the sites of those bloggers you follow.

The Read More link serves a different purpose at Amazon.

Amazon knows that most customers won’t read a lengthy description. So Amazon only shows up front the amount of text that a typical customer may actually read.

Authors should visit their product pages and check out the portion of the description that customers can see without the extra click. Move any pertinent information into that portion of the product description.

Read Tuesday

Imagine a Black Friday type of event just for book lovers.

You don’t have to imagine it. It’s called Read Tuesday, and it’s free: www.readtuesday.com.

Please support the Read Tuesday Thunderclap. This will help spread awareness on the morning of Read Tuesday (December 9, 2014). It’s easy to help:

  • Visit http://thndr.it/1CkO2Bg.
  • Click Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr and sign in.
  • Customize the message. (Optional.)
  • Agree to the terms. All that will happen is that the Thunderclap post about Read Tuesday will go out the morning of December 9.
  • (The warning message simply means that Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr need your permission to post the Thunderclap message on December 9. This is the only post that Thunderclap will make.)

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2014 Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • Boxed set (of 4 books) now available for Kindle pre-order

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

Comments

Click here to jump to the comments section:

https://chrismcmullen.wordpress.com/2014/11/16/read-more/#comments

Thank You, Thank You :-)

3000

SO AMAZING!

It’s hard to believe, and I owe it all to you. Yes, you:

I checked my WordPress stats, and was elated to find:

  • 3,000 followers
  • 65,000 views
  • 610 posts
  • 5,000 comments
  • 170 countries
  • 159 search terms (today)
  • 699 posts in the self-publishing category
  • 11 clicks to Amazon and 8 clicks to KDP.Amazon (today)
  • and many other wonderful numbers

Technically, I have 3,492 followers, although I only have 3,029 WordPress followers.

You see, there is a little secret: Your Facebook and Twitter followers, if you associate these accounts to your WordPress blog, count as part of your following.

I was late to the social media game, so most of my followers are at WordPress. My 106 Facebook author page likes and 357 Twitter followers are the reason WordPress advertises that I have 3,492 followers on my blog site.

I’m glad to see that WordPress displays the actual number of site views on my webpage with the corresponding widget. (I tried another website once and it actually ASKED me what I wanted the initial number of views to be. Well, I guess we can’t believe everything we read on the internet…)

NOT THE WAY IT STARTED

The following graph tells the story:

Views

The first year was ZILCH.

The second year saw a little activity.

It started out really slow, like virtually all other blogs.

Think you had a rough start? Mine may have been even rougher:

  • I registered for WordPress and made my “Hello, World” post on May 8, 2011.
  • To date, that post still has 0 likes and 0 comments. It had just a few views. Ever. Even now.
  • I made my second post on December 14, 2012—a year and a half later.
  • My second post has 5 likes, but at least it generated some views at the time.

I went 1.5 years without a single Like. Yep, it was a slow start.

I dipped my toe in the WordPress water in 2011, and came back with an actual plan at the end of 2012.

What was my plan?

  • Provide free help to other authors and self-publishers.
  • Motivate and encourage other authors.
  • Become effective at marketing and serve as an example to other authors that it’s possible to embrace this and do it effectively.
  • Enjoy writing articles on my blog and have fun with it.

The best parts were unexpected:

  • The interaction here at WordPress is amazing.
  • The community here at WordPress is incredible.
  • I never expected to make such wonderful connections.
  • I have come to love writing for my blog even more than writing books. (Shh.) (Don’t worry. I’ll keep writing books, too.)

Blogging can start out exceptionally s-l-o-w. But it has much potential to accelerate.

Don’t focus on your numbers now. See if you can grow your numbers over time. Play the long game.

If you can grow your numbers over time, your blog has much potential.

Likes and follows are absolutely wonderful, but there is another number you need to focus on.

How many visitors come to your website per day, on average, via search engines?

I had 375 views today. 243 of those are from search engines.

In the early days (2013), I just had a few views per day, a few likes per post, a few followers. But a couple of my posts were generating traffic through search engines.

My search engine stats steadily grew. Still, as you can see in the graph above, it started very slow and took much time to grow.

If you can get any search engine traffic and gradually build on this number, you have much potential to transform your blog into a content-rich website.

Your blog has three goals when it comes to marketing. Likes and follows only relate to two of those goals.

  • The people you interact with regularly often support your posts with likes and comments. The support is amazing, and this interaction makes your blog feel lively. But don’t sweat it in the early days of your blog when you aren’t getting much interaction. This will come, especially depending on you—make valuable contributions to the community.
  • Your followers include active followers and ghosts. It can be demoralizing to realize this. Your following is less than you’d like, and only a fraction of that is active. But don’t let that bother you. It’s growing, so it has much potential. Your following helps to support you when you release a new book. Perhaps not through sales, but perhaps through reblogs and branding.
  • Search engine traffic can net you the most sales of all. If you get 100’s of visitors per day from your target audience exploring content on your website, these are people who didn’t already know about your book(s) with whom you are suddenly getting exposure.

Blogging is hard work, but it’s fun.

Blogging starts out very slow, but can become an effective content-rich website over time.

Blogging is amazing because of the WordPress community.

THANK YOU VERY MUCH, EVERYONE. That means you, too. Yes, you.

If you haven’t yet reached as many views and followers as I have, I hope you get there soon. You will. Don’t give up.

And if you’ve reached many more views and followers than I have, wow. That’s amazing! congratulations! Way to go!

No matter what, YOU are wonderful. Thank you for being part of WordPress.

Read Tuesday

Imagine a Black Friday type of event just for book lovers.

You don’t have to imagine it. It’s called Read Tuesday, and it’s free: www.readtuesday.com.

Please support the Read Tuesday Thunderclap. This will help spread awareness on the morning of Read Tuesday (December 9, 2014). It’s easy to help:

  • Visit http://thndr.it/1CkO2Bg.
  • Click Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr and sign in.
  • Customize the message. (Optional.)
  • Agree to the terms. All that will happen is that the Thunderclap post about Read Tuesday will go out the morning of December 9.
  • (The warning message simply means that Facebook, Twitter, or Tumblr need your permission to post the Thunderclap message on December 9. This is the only post that Thunderclap will make.)

Halloween Reading

Looking for some spooky books to read this Halloween month?

https://chrismcmullen.wordpress.com/scary-books

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2014 Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing
  • Boxed set (of 4 books) now available for Kindle pre-order

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

Comments

Click here to jump to the comments section:

https://chrismcmullen.wordpress.com/2014/10/28/marketing-with-a-blog/#comments

Learn Much about Self-Publishing by… Blogging

Blog First

Hands-on Self-Publishing Experience

Blogging at WordPress can teach you more about self-publishing than you might realize.

Think about this, and strive to get the most out of it.

It would be wise to blog before self-publishing for the hands-on experience every authorpreneur needs to be successful.

But even if you’ve already self-published, it’s not too late to make the connection between blogging and indie publishing.

Here are several ways that blogging at WordPress can help you become a more successful authorpreneur:

  • Crafting the title. You have to write titles for your blog articles, so you get plenty of experience trying out titles and seeing how much attention your posts get. The title is a very important part of your book. Without blogging, most authors would have no experience or practice writing titles and seeing what interest they stimulate. Study the titles of articles from popular bloggers.
  • Content popularity. Writing about different topics, you can see which seem to be more popular or less popular among bloggers. The best way to learn what people like is through first-hand experience.
  • Keywords and categories. Gain experience choosing categories and tags for your articles at WordPress. You’ll need to choose categories and keywords when you publish. For your blog, you can type phrases in Google to see how popular they are, and for your book, you can try phrases out at Amazon’s home page. When you come across popular blog articles similar to what you write, check out the tags and categories that they used.
  • Cover design. Preparing or linking to images in your posts gives you some feedback regarding how to attract an audience visually. You also see images that evidently attract much attention to popular blog articles. The more you prepare your own images, the more you learn little tips.
  • Look Inside. In the WordPress reader, people only see a short sample. Bloggers strive to learn how to use the beginning of the article to create interest in the article. Similarly, at Amazon, you need to write an engaging blurb and Look Inside.
  • Writing practice. Blogging offers writing practice for self-published authors. You can even try out a new style or genre, with real readers to offer feedback.
  • Build your brand. At WordPress, you strive to build your blogging brand. This will carry over to becoming an authorpreneur, where you need to develop brands as an author and for your books.
  • Learn about marketing. You get firsthand experience trying to market your blog, which will carry over to book marketing. You get to see what other authors do in the way of marketing. Plus, blogging helps you build helpful relationships that can help you with your marketing when your book comes out. Some of your followers will serve as your initial fan base, too.
  • Monitor traffic. WordPress shows several stats that help you analyze your blog traffic. This can help give you a sense of the potential of your blog to help with marketing—a small percentage may be your initial fan base, but more importantly, the search engine traffic helps you see what frequency of outside visitors discover your website daily. The number of likes per post gives you some idea of your active following, which can pale in comparison to your total following; the search engine traffic is the number with the greater potential.
  • Get support. Relationships that you build on WordPress can support you with advice, reblogs, feedback, and more when you begin your self-publishing journey.
  • Explore formatting options. You have to format your posts here at WordPress. As you try new things in your articles, you gain some formatting experience. An e-book formats much like a webpage.
  • Test an idea. Got an idea that you want to test out? Try a sample on your blog and get some feedback.
  • Meet your audience. A thin slice of your WordPress following will include readers from your target audience. These interactions are golden.
  • Device management. Over time, you happen to view your blog from your pc, laptop, a friend’s iPad, a cell phone, etc. This gives you some idea about how various things format on different devices. That’s good experience for the challenge of formatting e-books that read well across all devices.
  • Analyze stats. Stats at Amazon are pretty limited—royalties, sales rank, reviews. You get many more stats here at WordPress—countries, views, likes, follows, shares, comments, etc. Such data can be valuable. You could even make a graph of your blog views for the month and compare it with your sales graph to see if there may be any correlation.
  • Website development. Indie publishers need to have websites, Facebook author or book pages, author profiles, etc. The experience you gain transforming your blog into a website will help you anytime you need to create a webpage or website.
  • SEO. You write articles hoping to pull in traffic from search engines. You gain experience with SEO as you try out categories, experiment with how to include keywords in headings and body text, etc.
  • Grow a following. You’ll develop a following here at WordPress. Setup an author page at Facebook and link to it at the end of your posts, and feed your WordPress posts into Facebook (but don’t also feed Facebook into WordPress or you’ll get double posts). Similarly, feed your blog into Twitter (but don’t feed from Twitter to WordPress or Facebook, or again you’ll get double or triple posts). Create profiles at Google Plus and LinkedIn, and your WordPress traffic can help you grow a following everywhere.
  • Build connections. Meet fellow authors, editors, graphic designers, small publishers, and more in your WordPress interactions. Indie authorship is a supportive community, for the most part.
  • Create buzz. When you release a book, your blog will help you create buzz for it.

Of course, there are many other benefits to blogging. For example, you can make some great online friends, and you can find some excellent material to read for free here at WordPress. Arguably, friendships and great reading material are the BEST parts of WordPress.

Chris McMullen

Copyright © 2014 Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

  • Volume 1 on formatting and publishing
  • Volume 2 on marketability and marketing

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

Comments

Click here to jump to the comments section:

https://chrismcmullen.wordpress.com/2014/08/03/learn-much-about-self-publishing-by-blogging/#comments

Reblog: Better to Delay?

Reblog

When you write what you feel is a great post and see a few early reblogs, that show of support is wonderful.

How about that delayed reblog that comes days, weeks, or even months later?

Did this person miss the party?

Or…

Is the delayed reblog even better?

I’ve received a couple of delayed reblogs lately (thank you very much), and personally I love it.

It revitalizes your post.

Early reblogs may help your topic look like it’s trending now—wow, that looks popular.

But they can also look a bit spammy, especially as many bloggers share many common followers.

Those common followers also mean that readers see all of those reblogs in the same window of opportunity.

The delayed reblog helps to reach readers who were inactive during the original post.

Of course, if you intentionally delay, you may forget to reblog, you might not find the post again, or you might get wrapped up in your other work, as busy as we are.

Save the post to your Favorites on your browser. That will make it easy to find later. If you like the post enough to reblog it, you surely like it enough that you might want to hunt it down several months from now, in which case it will be really handy on your Favorites list.

What do you think?

Reblog now or reblog later?

Publishing Resources

I started this blog to provide free help with writing, publishing, and marketing. You can find many free articles on publishing and marketing by clicking one of the following links:

Chris McMullen, Author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers

Follow me at WordPress, find my author page on Facebook, or connect with me through Twitter.

How Are You Adapting to the New WordPress Reader?

Reader

We’ve now had some time to experience and possibly adjust or adapt to the new changes in the WordPress Reader. How are you handling it?

There has been some applause for the return of the word count. Yay!

My eyes have adjusted to the larger text. It was a shock for the first few days, but now it looks normal. However, I still regret that one post very often takes the entire screen height on my rather large monitor. It takes much more scrolling to read the same number of posts. Very likely, this means that more readers are giving up sooner, so more posts are going unread.

Indeed, I’ve noticed that I get more or much less activity depending on the timing of the post. If people are checking their posts after several hours, anything buried down at the bottom is less likely to get attention.

That popup window is still annoying and requires several extra clicks (unless you click on the word count). If you actually make it to the blogger’s site, you’ll see something new at the bottom of the post. It will show a few related posts. Unfortunately (perhaps), these seem to be automatically generated. These may help to generate interest in prior posts.

A second complaint about the popup window is that many readers aren’t making it to the blogs. They miss out on the design of the blog and content geared toward the target audience. This really affects bloggers who have something for sale on their blogs. Those who have paid for upgrades aren’t happy about the new Reader providing a means of reading the blog without visiting the site. If they choose to only show a portion of the blog in the Reader, hoping to lure the reader to their site, they run the risk of the reader giving up because it’s too many clicks.

The WordPress forum specifically devoted to this issue is now 10 pages long. You can find it by clicking here. There is talk of reading blogs in bloglovin’ that might be worth checking out.

Here are my previous posts on this issue:

Chris McMullen, author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers, Vol. 1 (formatting/publishing) and Vol. 2 (packaging/marketing), Facebook page, Twitter

Temporary Fixes to a Couple of the New WordPress Reader Problems

Band Aids

Update: WordPress staff have since added a word count at the end of the sample in the Reader. If you click on the word count at the end of the sample, it will take you directly to the blogger’s website, rather than opening the post in the Reader.

What’s the advantage of doing this? That way, you won’t have to click twice to read one post. Some bloggers allow you to read the full post in the Reader, others set it so that you can only read part of the post in the Reader. In the latter case, if you click once to open the post in the Reader, you’ll need to click a second time to visit the blog and read the rest of the post.

So just clicking the word count to visit the post on the blog, rather than in the Reader, saves a click. If you have hundreds of posts in your Reader, this can save a lot of extra clicking.

(This post originally had a suggestion for allowing readers to go straight to the post on your blog from the Reader, but now that WordPress has added the word count link at the end of the sample in the Reader, that work-around is no longer necessary.)

Update on the new WordPress Reader

Reader Update

Perhaps the changes to the WordPress Reader are oriented towards the trend of more people accessing websites and reading blogs on mobile devices, as suggested in the following post:

http://onecoolsitebloggingtips.com/2013/11/05/wordpress-com-reader-update/

That may explain, for example, why the post opens in a new window—but not the actual website—when you first click on it, and allows you to like or comment without visiting the actual website. Unless, of course, the website restricts the Reader from showing the entire post, in which case you must click a second time to access the post. Then you have to close two separate windows when you’re done, so we’re clicking twice as often. That’s in addition to scrolling several times more because of the larger images and text.

It’s a shame that you can read some posts entirely in the new Reader window that pops up, completely missing the blogger’s header, background images, social media links, products for sale, and all the other content that blogger prepared on his or her website, hoping to draw a little traffic with the blog post.

On a positive note, the images seem to be displaying on all of the posts now.

I’m getting used to the font size and picture display now, but my wrist is sore from all the extra clicking and scrolling.

There are some threads about this in the WordPress forum. The following thread is now up to three pages. You can find a comment from one of the Happiness Engineers on page 3 of the thread (I strongly urge you to read this if you’re curious about why WordPress did this and what they think about the reactions that have been posted). It also provides informative clarification on whether or not the new Reader window will affect your stats.

http://en.forums.wordpress.com/topic/reader-changed/page/3?replies=4

If you would like to share your feedback, please click on the above thread. Perhaps you can help them “engineer more happiness.”

Here are links to my two previous posts on the status of the new WordPress Reader, in case you missed them:

Chris McMullen, author of A Detailed Guide to Self-Publishing with Amazon and Other Online Booksellers, Vol. 1 (formatting/publishing) and Vol. 2 (packaging/marketing)

Share Your Opinion about the New WordPress Reader

Reader

Don’t like the new WordPress Reader?

Do like it?

Either way, share your opinion. There is an open forum about this at WordPress here:

http://en.forums.wordpress.com/topic/reader-changed?replies=4#post-1503145

Haven’t tried the new Reader? Check it out.

The only way for WordPress to know how people feel about this is if people share their opinions. So if you don’t (or do) like it, let WordPress know. They may not respond to one opinion, but if there are numerous responses, perhaps that will get some attention.

I love WordPress, and I love the old Reader. I want to keep loving WordPress. How do you feel?

Some of the changes that I’ve observed are summarized in my previous post.

Chris McMullen

New WordPress Reader? What Do You Think? (Updated)

Reader

My WordPress Reader has looked much different as of yesterday. I wondered if maybe it was just being haunted for Halloween, but if so, the ghosts aren’t very good at keeping track of the calendar. So, is it just me?

The font size is larger in my reader, I see fewer posts on the screen at a time, and I don’t see the word count.

With fewer posts per screen, I have to do a lot more scrolling to skim through it and find posts that interest me. It just seems like a greater chance of people giving up sooner.

I guess the font is a little more readable. But I was used to it the way it was, so now it just seems too large. I guess I’ll get used to this, too, if it stays this way.

The disappearance of the word count seems interesting. Were short posts getting more attention, and long posts being overlooked (or vice-versa), because people were checking out the word count? If so, removing this will force us to choose the post that interests us regardless of length. Or will it cause frustrations, or less use of the Reader?

I think all of the clicks where people get to the post, then think ugh, that’s too short or too long—all that wasted energy will mean some posts that would have been read won’t get read.

Yesterday, there was a huge gap in posts, from 1 hr ago to 16 days ago. I’m sorry if I missed any posts that I would normally read.

That Follow by Email button is handy for blogs we really look forward to. 🙂

And is there an issue with pictures showing in the Reader? It seems that some posts have pictures (are they smaller?), yet none of the pictures show in the Reader.

If WordPress did make changes to the Reader, I wonder if they were beta tested. (Or is this part of a beta test?) If so, maybe they have already determined that the pros outweigh any cons.

There is a forum on this topic now: http://en.forums.wordpress.com/topic/reader-changed?replies=4#post-1503145

I keep looking for a button on my Reader that I might accidentally have pressed. (Is this all just a big OOPS?)

Have you had the same experience? What are your thoughts?

Chris McMullen